GINI index

Saudi Arabia



Latest Data Values

DateValue% Change
2009 0.00 0.00%
2008 0.00 0.00%
2007 0.00 0.00%
2006 0.00 0.00%
2005 0.00 0.00%
2004 0.00 0.00%
2003 0.00 0.00%
2002 0.00 0.00%
2001 0.00 0.00%
2000 0.00 0.00%
1999 0.00 0.00%
1998 0.00 0.00%
1997 0.00 0.00%
1996 0.00 0.00%
1995 0.00 0.00%
1994 0.00 0.00%
1993 0.00 0.00%
1992 0.00 0.00%
1991 0.00 0.00%
1990 0.00 0.00%
1989 0.00 0.00%
1988 0.00 0.00%
1987 0.00 0.00%
1986 0.00 0.00%
1985 0.00 0.00%
1984 0.00 0.00%
1983 0.00 0.00%
1982 0.00 0.00%
1981 0.00 0.00%
1980 0.00 0.00%
1979 0.00 0.00%
1978 0.00 0.00%
1977 0.00 0.00%
1976 0.00 0.00%
1975 0.00 0.00%
1974 0.00 0.00%
1973 0.00 0.00%
1972 0.00 0.00%
1971 0.00 0.00%
1970 0.00 0.00%
1969 0.00 0.00%
1968 0.00 0.00%
1967 0.00 0.00%
1966 0.00 0.00%
1965 0.00 0.00%
1964 0.00 0.00%
1963 0.00 0.00%
1962 0.00 0.00%
1961 0.00 0.00%
1960 0.00 0.00%

Economic Indicator Details

Source:World Bank, Development Research Group. Data are based on primary household survey data obtained from government statistical agencies and World Bank country departments. Data for high-income economies are from the Luxembourg Income Study database. For more information and methodology, please see PovcalNet (http://iresearch.worldbank.org/PovcalNet/jsp/index.jsp).
Notes:Gini index measures the extent to which the distribution of income (or, in some cases, consumption expenditure) among individuals or households within an economy deviates from a perfectly equal distribution. A Lorenz curve plots the cumulative percentages of total income received against the cumulative number of recipients, starting with the poorest individual or household. The Gini index measures the area between the Lorenz curve and a hypothetical line of absolute equality, expressed as a percentage of the maximum area under the line. Thus a Gini index of 0 represents perfect equality, while an index of 100 implies perfect inequality.
Topic:Poverty

The World Bank periodically prepares poverty assessments of countries in which it has an active program, in close collaboration with national institutions, other development agencies, and civil society, including poor people\s organizations. Assessments report the extent and causes of poverty and propose strategies to reduce it. Countries have varying definitions of poverty, and comparisons can be difficult. National poverty lines tend to have higher purchasing power in rich countries, where standards used are more generous than in poor countries. Poverty measures based on an international poverty line attempt to hold the real value of the poverty line constant across countries, including when making comparisons over time. Data here includes measures of population living below the national poverty line as well as the international poverty line. Also included are income distributions and urban and rural poverty rates.